Tag Archives: woodworking

Janell’s Tops: Part 3

While Janell was an apprentice to Hiroi-sensei, he encouraged her to produce tops that dealt with themes related to American folk culture and lore that reflected both her background and the art and culture of her new home through traditional Japanese crafts. The photos below show tops Janell made in the 1980s. There are both western-themed tops and traditional Japanese tops.

Advertisements

Media Post メディアポスト: Hiroi at Work 働く廣井先生

Creating Edogoma involves careful work within the workshop. Hiroi-sensei creates his own tools and spends hours at the lathe carving and painting his tops. The following photos show Hiroi-sensei at work in his small workshop at the front of his store and home in Akiu Craft Village.

江戸独楽の製作には工房での慎重な作業が求められる。廣井先生は自作の道具と旋盤を使い、何時間もかけて独楽を削り出して色付けする。秋保工芸の里にある独楽店の前には、廣井先生の自宅兼工房がある。こちらは小さな工房で働く廣井先生の写真である。

Hiroi-sensei and his apprentices

In this post, Hiroi-sensei highlights his own experiences as an apprentice and the many years he instructed others. He describes the apprenticing process and the years of dedication necessary to become a master top-maker.

===

===

Paula Curtis: And to continue, can you tell us a little about your experience as an apprentice?

Hiroi Michiaki: As an apprentice?

Paula: Yes, um, such as, when you were an Edo top apprentice and first began learning it, what was the most difficult thing, for example. Could you explain a bit about that experience?

Hiroi: Ahh… yes. The most difficult thing was whether a top would spin well or not. At the beginning I didn’t know what I should do to make it spin well. That was definitely the most difficult thing. It’s still hard now, though, it’s still difficult. How it will spin, how I should produce it to get different ways of moving; since the many ways it moves depend on the strength of the top. That foundation… making the top so that it spins, that’s the most [difficult]. A lot of years… it takes a lot of years [to learn], you know. Even now it’s the same. That’s really the most difficult thing.

Paula: Even now, um–

Hiroi: Even now.

Paula: Even now, do your apprentices think that is the most difficult thing [to learn]?

Hiroi: Ahh, I don’t know what my apprentices think. I think it’s probably the same, though. And for tops, you know right away. Whether it’s good or bad. No matter how many you make with this shape, if you spin it and watch and it goes rattling about, it’s not a good one. So that’s the most difficult part. I think my apprentices probably have that same worry, even now, worried [about how they spin].

Paula: When did you first start accepting apprentices?

Hiroi: Mm, when was my first apprentice…?  Ahh, it was after we came to Fukuhara, right. Umm it was some years ago… mm, it was some years ago so I’ve forgotten. Quite a while back. It was before we came here, so we came here at least twenty-five years ago, and it was before that, so about thirty years ago, I think.

Paula: How many apprentices do you usually have?

Hiroi: At first it was one. And I mentioned this before, but that apprentice had a lot of friends and brought seven people with him, so, yeah, it was when we were in Fukuhara, so before we came here.

Paula: Um, when Janell came here to learn about these Edo tops, did you have [other] apprentices did you have at that time?

Hiroi: At that time… ah! I already had some apprentices, seven of them. The apprentices from Shiroishi were already here at that time. And in addition to them, um, there were a number of people, umm, who like Landis-sensei came here to learn as a hobby… Amano-san, Jin-san… umm… Suzuki-san, Zanma-san… ahh, also there was Shimamura-san, Watanabe-san… who else was there… Amano-san, Jin-san… Junna-san, Suzuki-san… and… Ah! Today, err? Kyōya-san, was he around that time? When we were in Fukuhara. Kyōya-san…

Mrs. Hiroi: Also there was the Jins.

Hiroi: So, Amano-san, Jin-san, and Zanma-san, Suzuki-san, Kyōma-san…

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. That’s about it.

Hiroi: That was about all the people doing it as a hobby. Ah, and Landis-sensei, too.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. So that’s about it.

Hiroi: Six people doing it as a hobby. And other than them, there were people doing it professionally… Ah, Shinomura-san was doing it for a hobby at first, and from that beginning went pro.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: So other than the seven from Shiroishi that I said before, the people who became professionals were the two from Marumori and today’s Tome. Umm, seven people plus two people, so nine.

Mrs. Hiroi: Mm.

Hiroi: Nine people, these were those aiming at being pros and who were pros. And the other six were amateurs doing it as a hobby. So in all there was ten– ah, there was also Morimoto-san.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. There was also Morimoto-san.

Hiroi: Right. In that case there was a lot. Fifteen or sixteen. Heh heh heh. So there was a turnover.

[7:13]

Paula: And were you apprentices usually men? Women?

Hiroi: Female apprentices. Umm with Landis-sensei as the first, then there was Jin-san’s wife. And… there was Yamada-san. Umm… female apprentices…

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah… yeah… that was about it.

Hiroi: Is that about it? I thought there was someone else…

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. There weren’t [that many] women.

Hiroi: Only three? It was three women.

Paula: Going pro…?

Hiroi: Mmm… probably…

Paula: Was there no one?

Hiroi: There was no one who went pro that was a hobbyist, but there are people above pro. But that doesn’t mean that they’re making a living from it…

Paula: About how old were people who became apprentices? At the beginning, at the beginning–

Hiroi: When they first came?

Paula: Yeah.

Hiroi: How old were they? Around that time I think everyone was in their thirties.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: Yeah… it was their thirties. Yeah. Among the men, who was the oldest?

Mrs. Hiroi: Around that time wasn’t there Minoru-kun?

Hiroi: Minoru-kun was so young at that time.

Mrs. Hiroi: Was he that young?

Hiroi: He was still a child.

Mrs. Hiroi: Was he?

Hiroi: Yeah, yeah, was he in his twenties? [Or] in his thirties.

Mrs. Hiroi: Uh, who, who was?

Hiroi: Was he in his thirties? Yeah, everyone was, weren’t they?

Mrs. Hiroi: That’s how it was. Yeah.

Hiroi: The oldest person… ah, was it Watanabe-san? Mm. Watanabe-san was the oldest. He was from a place called Marumori. And he was interesting, I have a story about him. His younger sister’s husband, he was from Marumori. And this sister, the man she married, her husband, he was the chauffeur for the mayor of Marumori. And I was often told that in Marumori they didn’t have any special [local] products, so they wanted me to make something. And at that time, when they said “Let’s make something!” in Marumori, there was one person who made kokeshi, and they asked him if he’d make them something. I spoke with them about it, but ahh– “bring him along”– [no,] I think they said to bring what I’d made and show them to see what they were.

Mrs. Hiroi: Mm. Yeah.

Hiroi: Then I brought my goods, but they were the [amusing] sort you laugh at. And that guy was someone who specialized in making a new kind of kokeshi using unfinished wood; it seems that he didn’t make them himself, but he made the unfinished wood to order, and didn’t have any experience making them himself. And I brought him with me, and at the time, because they came from the town hall… did the mayor come? The mayor, and– ah, no, it was the deputy mayor.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. The deputy mayor.

Hiroi: The deputy mayor and… umm, the section chief of the commerce and industry division. I think three people came.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. Three people came.

Hiroi:  I wonder if the mayor came… In any case, three people from the town hall came to my home with his younger sister’s husband. And they came saying that they had thought about something that could be the special local product of Marumori, and [asked] whether I had anything good. At that time, uhh, and then, the thing I made was, umm, this sort of… is there a pencil? Umm, this kind of shape… [drawing]  and here there’s… this top with three [other tops] attached.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. Three [tops] attached to it.

Hiroi: It’s in this shape, one, two, three. I made this kind of top… and I made this kind of top, but they didn’t understand what it was for some reason. In Japanese, it’s “marui” (round), round and there’s three trees. There are three trees in the round place, so it becomes “Marumori.” [translator’s note: the town’s name, Marumori, is comprised of the kanji for “round” and for “forest.” The character for “forest,” mori 森,  is made up of three of the “tree” kanji (木), making this a pun on three round objects representing trees becoming a “round forest,” or “marumori,” the town name.]

And I made this top and show it to them and the people from town hall were surprised and said, “Ohh, this is great!” So they took it and had the person I mentioned before, Watanabe-san, make it, and it’s [now] sold as Marumori’s special product. They’re [still] making it now. They’re still making it now, though I don’t know where they’re selling it, but I hear it’s still made somewhere. So a few might still be sold somewhere, but I don’t know. I don’t know how they’re selling it. But at that time, for the first time I met Watanabe-san, and the people from town hall said that they definitely wanted me to make him an apprentice and teach him. When he came, he was quite a different age than you, wasn’t he?

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: He was the oldest [of the apprentices]. He also had a lot of experience. Even now there are a lot of shops that have the products he’s made. He might come here directly today. Yesterday he called and he said he might come. He was the oldest.

Paula: How many years are your apprentices apprenticed to you before they become independent top-makers?

Hiroi: Umm, in the end it takes ten years. Of course, it takes half a year or a year to learn the lathe. And then there’s a lot to remember. Even for someone like Maeda-kun, who can do it all now, it took ten years. It takes ten years.

Paula: Did you have any foreign apprentices after that?

Hiroi: No, after that, I didn’t any apprentices, but the people who came because they liked it were those that Landis-sensei introduced to me. They were her friends, and Newton-san, Landis-sensei had– what was it? Was he from Shichigahama? Takayama? After she returned to America, Newton-san joined [my workshop]. Newton-san came to my home for a while, but I think he moved somewhere before the [Tōhoku] earthquake. It was that he moved to Okayama or somewhere shortly after, right? So I think he wasn’t around for the earthquake, the tsunami.

And other than him, there was a person from Sweden, a person from Denmark, and– where was it? Was he Japanese? And there was another person. An American. Someone related to [Janell’s] church, I think. And they gave me wooden clogs or something. Clogs from Sweden or Denmark– I thought they were from Holland and they were like “No, you’re wrong!” and “Mine are the real thing.” I have the clogs somewhere, I could find them if I looked. And often when they came, they’d make me cherry-shaped [tops]. They said it was because they loved cherries, [so they made] cherry-shaped tops. If you travel to Sweden and Denmark, they have purple and yellow cherries, not just red ones. So I asked them to [make tops] in all kinds of colors. So they did, and I was delighted.

But they didn’t become apprentices. In that time, ummm… their term [of office], they had to switch jobs, so they had to go back to their countries. So both of them had to go back to their countries at the same time, and I never met them again. And one more person, who was it? Newton-san came every day, didn’t he? Until he moved to Okayama. He came until the earthquake happened. So he must have moved to Okayama just before that. And Landis-sensei brought him. Yeah, and Landis-sensei told him to become an apprentice, and he half-wanted to, but it was impossible for me [to make him do it]. Heh heh heh. He didn’t become an apprentice. He was a handsome person. Heh heh heh. When you met him you were like “Whoooa.” Hahahaha.

[25:50]

 

廣井先生と弟子

廣井先生自身が見習いだった時の経験や、長く弟子に独楽づくりを教えていた年月について語っている。弟子入りのプロセスや独楽職人となるために必要な年数などについて説明している。

===

===

ポーラ・カーティス:で、続いて、あのう、先生の弟子としての経験を、ま、少し説明していただけませんか。

廣井道顕:弟子としてのって?

ポーラ:はい、あのう、江戸独楽の弟子として、ま、最初に習ったときは、まあ、先生には一番難しいところはなんでしたかとか、そのような経験について少し説明していだたけませんか。

廣井:あぁ・・・はい。一番難しかったのはね、独楽がよく回るか回らないか。どうしたらよく回るのかなぁっていうのが、最初よく分らなくて。難しかったのは、それが一番ですね。それは今も、そうなんですけど、同じなんですけど。いかによく回して、どう、いろんな動きが、その独楽の力によって、いろんな動きを、こう作り出すっていうか。それの基本・・・が、その、独楽が回るように作るっていう、それが一番、何年も・・・あー、何年もどころでないね。未だに、そうなんですけども。それがやっぱり一番難しかったですね。

ポーラ:今も、あのう―

廣井:今も。

ポーラ:先生の弟子は、あの、今も先生の弟子は同じところが一番難しいと、あの、思っていますか。

廣井:あぁ、弟子たちはどう思ってるか、分らないですけど。多分同じ、だと思うんですけどね。で、独楽の場合は、すぐ分るんですよね。よし、良い悪いが。いくらこう形ができても、回してみるとガタガタになってれば、ね、いいもんでもないし。だからその点がね、一番難しいところで。多分今も弟子たちも同じ悩みに、悩んでると思うんですけどね。

ポーラ:先生は初めて弟子を受け入れる時はいつでしたか。

廣井:ええ、はじめて弟子を・・・いつごろなんだ?あぁ、袋原に行ってからだよな。ううんとね、何年前だ・・・ううん、何年前だか忘れてしまったので。結構前ですね。ここへ来る前ですから、ここへ来てもう、二十五年になるから、その前だから、三十年ぐらい前かな。

ポーラ:普通は弟子何人いますか。

廣井:最初は一人。で、さっきも話したけど、その弟子が、あの仲間をいっぱい、七人連れてきたのが、ええ、やっぱり袋原にいるとき、こっちに来る前ですね。

ポーラ:あのう、ジャネルさんがここで、あの、あの、この江戸独楽について、学びましたときは、そのときは、弟子何人いましたか。

廣井:そのときは・・・あっ、もういたんだね、七人。白石から来た弟子たちが、もういましたね、そのとき。でその他に、あのう、趣味で、ランディス先生みたく、趣味で習いに来てた弟子が、うーんと、あんとき何人いたんだ・・・天野さん、神(じん)さん・・・うんと・・・鈴木さん、残間(ざんま)さん・・・あぁ、あとは島村さん、渡辺さんとか・・・あと誰がいる・・・天野さん、神さん、・・・純名(じゅんな)さん、鈴木さん・・・いやあと、あっ!きょう、ん?京谷(きょうや)さんその頃だっけか。袋原にいるときだ。きょうやさん・・・

夫人:あとほら、神さんたち。

廣井:だから、天野さん、神さん、それから、残間さん、鈴木さん、京谷さん・・・

夫人:うん。それぐらいだよ。

廣井:趣味の人そんなもんだっけ。あぁ、でランディス先生もさ。

夫人:うん。んだ、それぐらいだ。

廣井:趣味、の人が六人。でその他に、プロの・・・あっ、篠村さん最初は趣味で、あぁ、最初からプロになるって来たんだっけか、篠村さんが。

夫人:うん。

廣井:だからプロになるっていう人が、今言ったの白石の七人の他に、あと丸森からと、あとそれから、今の登米からと、二人、参加しているから。ええと、七人と二人、九人か。

夫人:うん。

廣井:九人、これはプロを目指して、プロだった人で。であとの六人はあの趣味でアマチュアで。だから全部で十、あ、森本さんもいたな。

夫人:うん。んだ、森本さんいた。

廣井:だな。そうすっと何人なんだ。十五・六人いたね。へへへ。だから入れ替わり立ち替わり来たんだよな。

[7:13]

ポーラ:で、あの先生の弟子はたいてい男性ですか、女性ですか。

廣井:女性の弟子はね。ええとまずランディス先生はじめとして、じんさんの奥さんだべ。それから・・・山田さんがいたか。ええと・・・女性の弟子は・・・

夫人:うん・・・うん・・・それぐらいだっちゃ。

廣井:そんなものか。あれなんかもっと誰がいたような・・・

夫人:うん。女でいねえっちゃわ。

廣井:三人だけか。女性三人ですね。

ポーラ:プロまでは、あのう・・・

廣井:うんん・・・やっぱり・・・

ポーラ:誰もいないんですか。

廣井:趣味の人はまだプロになった人はいないんですけど、プロ以上の人はいるんですよ。でもそれで、それで生活してるわけではないんですけど・・・

ポーラ:弟子になる人は何歳ぐらいですか。はじめ、はじめ―

廣井:初め来たとき?

ポーラ:はい。

廣井:何歳ぐらいで。あの頃みな三十代かな。

夫人:うん。

廣井:そうだな・・・三十代でした、ね。うん。男性の場合は、一番、年かさの人は誰だ。

夫人:うん。あのあたりんときみのるくんあたりでなかった?

廣井:みのるくんだからずっと若いべあの頃。

夫人:若いかったがいや?

廣井:まだ子供だ。

夫人:んだっけか?

廣井:そうそう二十代だべ。三十代だ。

夫人:で、誰、誰だべ?

廣井:三十ぐらいになってたのか。やっぱみな三十代だな。

夫人:なってたんだっちゃ。うん。

廣井:一番年上の人・・・あ、渡辺さんか。うん。渡辺さんって人が一番年上。これはあの、丸森っていうところ、の人なんですけど。うんとね、その人も面白いちょっと話があるんですけど。その人はね、こいつの妹の旦那が、これ丸森出身なんですけど。で、この妹の、結婚した相手の旦那さまが、旦那が、あの町長の丸森町の、町長の運転手をやってたのね。そんであのう、丸森に何もこう名物がないから、何か作りたいんだって話が、よく聞かされてたんだって。であのう、あるときね、そんであの、丸森で、何か作ろうっていう話になったときに、あのう、こけしをやってる人が一人いるっていうことで、でその人に何か作ってもらうかっていうことになって。で話をしたんだけど。あぁ、連れてこい、あ、作った品物どんなんだか見してくれって言ったのかな。

夫人:うん。そう。

廣井:そしたら品物を持って来たんだけど、なんかちょっと笑っちゃうような、品物で。あのう、その人は新型のこけしの、白木を専門でやってた人で、自分で作ったわけでなくて、注文出て白木を作ってた人で、自分で何かを作ったっていう経験はなかったみたいなのね。でね、その人を連れて、来るからっていうことで、役場のあのときは・・・町長が来たんだっけか?役場の町長と、あぁ違う。助役だ。

夫人:うん。助役だ。

廣井:助役と・・・うんと商工課の、課長だか。なんか三人来たような気がするな。

夫人:うん、三人来たな。

廣井:町長も来たのかな・・・とにかく三人で役場の人が、こいつの妹の旦那が連れて、うちに来たのね。そしてあのう、丸森の名物になるようなものを、うん、考えているだけど、何か良い物ないですかって来られて。そのときにね、んで、あの、ではっつうんで、作ってやったのは、ええとね、こういう、あれ鉛筆ねぇかな・・・。うんとね、こういう形の・・・こういうところに・・・うん、こういう独楽をここに三つくっ付けたんですよ。

夫人:うん、三つくっ付けた。

廣井:こう一、二、三って、こういう形に。こういう独楽をね、作ってやったのね・・・・・・で、こういうの作ってやったけ、その人たち何だか分からなかったの。んでね、これあの日本語にすると、丸い、これも丸い・・・丸い、木が三つだから。丸いところに木が三つだから、丸森となるんですよ。

で、これを作って見してやったっけ、その人、役場の人たちがビックリして、わぁこれは良いっていうことで。ほんで持って行って、でその今言った渡辺さんっていう人に作らせて、丸森名物として、売り出して。で今も作ってるっつったな。なんか今も作って、どこで売ってるかは分かんないんですけど、なんか、今でも作ってるそうです。だから、少しずつは売れてるのかも分かんないね。どういう売り方してっかは分からないんですけど。でそのとき、初めて、その渡辺さんって方と会って、で是非、あの弟子にして、教えてほしいって役場の人にも頼まれて。で来たら、お前とといくらも歳違わないんだよな。

夫人:うん。

廣井:でその人が一番年上だし、経験もいっぱいある人で。今も、その人の作った品物店にいっぱい置いてあるんですけども。もしかすっと今日来るかも分かんないね。きのう電話でなんか今日、来るようなこと言ってたな。その人一番上ですね。

ポーラ:で、江戸独楽の弟子から職人、ま、個人の職人までの過程は何年ぐらいかかりますでしょうか。

廣井:ううん、やっぱり十年はかかりますね、どうしてもね。であのう轆轤にのって削れるようになるのにやっぱり半年、一年はかかるしね。それから、色々なものを覚えて。やっぱり何でもできる前田君みたく今、今の前田君だって十年かかってますからね。十年かかりますね。

ポーラ:そのときから他の外国人の弟子はいましたか。

廣井:いやその後は、弟子になった人はいないけども、あの好きで集めてくれた人は、やっぱりランディス先生の紹介で来たのかな。ランディス先生の友達でね、ニュートンさんって方が、でランディス先生がほらあの、七ヶ浜のあそこ何だ高山?アメリカに帰った後に、ニュートンさんが入ったんですけど。ニュートンさんしばらくうちに来てたんだけど、地震なる前にどっか引っ越したのかな。あぁ岡山だかどっかに移るんだって言ってたんだよな。だから地震には遭わなかった気がするんですけどね、津波にはね。

でその他にはあの、スウェーデンの方と、デンマークの方と、あとどこだっけ…えぇどこの国の人だっけな。あぁそれともう一人いたんだよな。アメリカの人かな。まぁ教会関係の、人みたい。であの、木靴なんかもらったね、デンマークだか、スウェーデンだかの…木靴っていうのはオランダのかなと思ったら『違うんだ』なんて。『私の方が本場です』なんて。木靴どこかにあるんだよな、探せばあるんだけども。でよく、あの来るとねあの、さくらんぼ作ってあげたのね。なんかさくらんぼ、チェリーが好きだからってんで、そのチェリーの独楽。したっけ、あのスウェーデンだかデンマークの方行くと、赤ばかりでなくて紫のもあるし黄色のもあるし、色々あるんだからなんて。いろんな色を付けてくれって。でいろんな色を付けてあげて、喜ばれたことがありますけどね。

ただ、弟子にまではならなかったなあ。でそのうち、なんか…ううん、でなんか時間、任期切れとか何だかで、国に帰らなきゃならないんだって。で二人、デンマークの人とスウェーデンの人を二人同時期に、国に帰ってしまって、それ以外会ってないですけどね。もう一人ね、だれ、なんつったか、あのニュートンさんは毎日来たんだよな、あの岡山に移る前、まで。んで地震が、起こる前までは来てたんですけど。だから多分あれ、すれすれで岡山行ったかも分からないよな。でニュートンさんは、あそうだランディス先生が連れてきたんだ。そうだそれであの、弟子になれってランディス先生に言われて、半分その気になったんだけど、私には無理ですっつうて。へへへ。弟子にはならなかったんだな。きれいな人でね。へへへ。会うとポーとするんだ。あはははは。

[25:50]

 

 

ジャネルの独楽: Part 1

ジャネルが弟子入りしている間、廣井氏はジャネルの生まれ育った場所と新しい故郷である日本の芸術・文化を、日本の伝統工芸を通して表現できるようにと、アメリカの民俗文化や伝承をテーマにした独楽も作ってみるよう勧めた。以下の写真は1980年代からジャネルが作った独楽です。

廣井先生と職人としての生き方

廣井先生が木工職人の生活と現代社会で日本の伝統工芸や芸術を伝え守っていくことの難しさを語っている。

===

===========================================

ポーラ・カーティス:あのう、そしてまぁ職人としての生活にはあのう、一番難しいことが何だと思いますでしょうか。

廣井道顕:一番難しいこと・・・難しいことばっかりだな。(laughs)簡単なのっつうのはないですね。どれが一番難しいって言われると、全部難しいね。一番、逆に嬉しいのが、お客さんとか、買ってもらった人が喜んでくれる。ワァァってやってくれっと、ものすごく嬉しい。後は毎日苦しんでいます。(grins)

ポーラ:(laughs) その、まぁあの難しいことが、もちろん、多いと、おっしゃいましたが、まぁあの時間とともに、ま、多少変化しましたか。何が難しいか、あのその、ビジネスとか、売るのとか。

廣井:まぁ職人として難しさは、やればやるほど難しくなってくのね。あと、売る、売るのは苦手なんだよね。だからね、うん、損ばっかりしてんのね。

ポーラ:で、あの職人の、あの職業がだんだん消えつつあると思いますでしょうか。それはなぜだと思いますか。

廣井:あぁ!そう。これが一番、あのう困ったことだなと思って、あのう・・・なぜか日本は職人て言うと軽く見られるんですよね。で職人がいないと、あのう、日本の大企業だって成り立たないはずなんだけども、なぜか職人は、馬鹿にされるしね、軽く見られるし。あのう・・・行政の方でも職人は軽く見て、何の援助もしてくれないしね。援助が欲しくて言うんではないけど、もっと大事にして欲しいなと思うのね。

だって日本が今こんだけ技術が発達してんだってその底辺ていうか、一番下には職人が必ずいるんですよね。職人がモノを作って、それを今度機会で大量に作ってって。であの、大企業が成り立って。で、その職人がだんだんいなくなってくれば、あのう何か今度やろうつったって何もたぶんできなくなると思うんですよね。だから、職業は、色々職人もあるけども、もうとにかくその職人っていう人をもっと大事にしてほしいなあと。まぁ希望ですけどね。

ポーラ:ではあのう、現在は、昔と比べると、弟子が多かったですか。

廣井:あぁ、うん。だからね。あのう、これはね、なんで弟子を多くしたかというと、あのう伝統こけしをやって、うんん・・・あの、こけしやっている人も何人もいたし。だからそれを集めてる人もいっぱいいたんですけれども。で、こけし描いてて、で売って、あのう収集している人に売って、どうのこうの、あれがダメだの、これがダメだのと、難しいこと言われて、うんと悩んで、でも一生懸命やって、ある程度できるようになって。まぁ本なんかでも、

こけしの本とか必ず名前が載るようになって。でそん時にね、気が付いたんですよ。『あぁ、うちにはこけしよりもっと大事なものがあった』って。こけしはいっぱいこけし屋さんがいて、完全に残っているけど、うちの江戸独楽はうち一軒なんですよね。日本中で。ということは世界中で。それを引き継いだのは俺と弟の二人だけで。日本では、でうちの場合は、あの、こけしみたく一つだけではなくて、何百何千って数があるものですから。一人でそれを再現して残しておくっていうことが不可能だなってのが気付いて。これは弟子をいっぱい増やさなきゃならないと思って。そんであのう、こけし屋さんの、若い跡取りを・・・あのううちに来たんですよ、あのう、これから先こけしだけでは、生活していかれなくなるんでねえかっていうことで他のことも覚えたいんだって、若いのが。

あの時ね、うちであのう、一人、あのう今の前田くんみたく一人あのう、教えてやってたのがいたのね。それがあのこけし屋さんの息子で、あの小原温泉の、人なんですけど、これも有名な人なんですけど、その人の子供で。雄介、本多雄介っていう。それがあのう、白石で、あのう、弥治郎系のこけし屋さんの息子たちの、子供たちの若い人の集まり、で七人いるんだって。で、その雄介が『今自分はこういう所でこういうもの習ってんだ』っていう話をしたらば、みんなそういうの覚えたいなっていうことになったって。で『教えてくれるか』って来たから。本当かってったら『本当だ』って言うのね。で、『みんな連れて来い』っつって。でそん時七人、白石から来たんですよ。では、教えてやったっていうことになって。

でまぁ、うちの品物はこけしと違って、種類がいっぱいあるし、遊び心がいっぱいなきゃならないので、まず『うちに来るんだったら真面目になってないで遊びな』っつったの。したっけ『えええ!』なんてみんなビックリして。へへへ。で、一人、本気になって遊んで、彼女見つけて結婚して。へへ。

今、こけしでは弥治郎で一番ぐらいになってるね。でそいつ、こ、独楽できなかったのね。まだあのう習い始めて半年だかって言うんで、ほとんど独楽できなくて。ほんで、こけし、ま親がこけし屋さんだから、で、まず、でまずこけしやったらいいでねえかっつうことで。で、こけし一生懸命やって。他の人たちはみんな独楽やって。したらみんな親たちにてっきり『怒られるかな、文句言われっかなあ』と思って『大事な、跡取り息子に余計なこと教えた!』なんて怒られるんじゃないかと思ってたら、みんな親たちが来て「宜しくお願いします」ってここでね、みんな頭ついてったね。七人とも。これには、逆にこっちの方でビックリしちゃって。『あぁこれ本気なんだな』と思って、ほんで一生懸命教えてやって。で、大体一人でもう百種類ぐらいは覚えたんのじゃないのかなと思うんですけどね。

ポーラ:あのう、まぁこの職人の職業がその、あのう消えつつある問題についてですが、どうすればいいと思いますでしょうか。あのう、そのまあ、人気があるように。

廣井:あぁ。そうね。

ポーラ:何かできますか。

廣井: そういうのがあると本当いいんですけどねえ。残念なことに日本にはまだそういう制度ないし。もうちょっと、偉い人がさっきも言ったように職人に、えぇ、こう、目を向けてくれれば、少しは、伝統的なものとか、技術が、残るんじゃないかな。で、若い人も、職人に、結構職人になりたい若い人いるんですよね。でも、職人の世界って難しい。で職人っていうのは頑固でなかなか。こう、馴染めないっていう、そっちのイメージの方が多くて恐ろしがってね、へへへ。なかなか『やりたくてもなぁ・・・』っていう人結構多いんですよね。だから、そういう人たちにね、もっとこう、スムーズに馴染んでもらって。育てたいな、と思っていたんですけど。ええと、去年ね、ええと一年半、仙台市で、この工芸の里で、後継者の育成をしようっていうことで市の、市がお金を出してくれて。で五人、入れたんですね若い人を。

で、あー、市で給料を出してくれて。ほんで教える方も、謝礼金として結構なお金、もらったんですけど。一年半続けて、で今年の三月でそれ終了したんですけど。んで結果的に残ったのが、うんと、小竹さんのとこに一人、うちに前田くんいるし、もう一人あのう、みさちゃんって女の子がいるんですけど。三人残ったんですけど。で、そういうことをもう少し続けてやってくれれば、もっと若い人が来ると思うんですけどね。で、あまりこう難しい条件、つけないでやってくれって言うんですけど。で今回はね、そんな難しい条件でなくても良かったし。で五人来て、ま結果三人残ることになったんですけど。大成功でないかなと思うんですけどね。

でこういうことを、こう繰り返し、市ばかりでなくてね、県とか国で、やってくれれば、若い後継者が日本中で結構増えると思うんですけどね。でまあ、同じ職人でもほら、うんとお金のある、所はね、自分の所でどんどん若手を育てることできるけど。我々みたいにお金のないのはね、それこそ前田くんでもみたくアルバイトをしながら、でも習いたいっつうんで来てた。そういう人たちあの、ホンモノになれると思うんですよね。だから、そういうところにね、もうちょっとこう、手を差し出てくれれば、もっと若手育てられて、日本も、もうちょっと豊かになれるような気がするんですけどね。

Hiroi and Janell’s First Meeting and Apprenticeship

In this interview segment, Hiroi-sensei describes his first time meeting Janell on a New Year’s television broadcast in Sendai. He discusses the beginning of their friendship and the start of her training with him as a top-making apprentice.

====

[25:42]

Paula: Was the attitude towards America and the West different in Sendai than in Tokyo?

Hiroi: No, in Tokyo, Americans… well, in Tokyo I didn’t meet any Americans. It was after I came to Sendai [that I did]. Because it was after the war. Like I said before, because I was living in the mountains without knowing the war ended. So I didn’t meet any Americans in Tokyo, and after the war, I was in Sendai. And in particular, [it was only] after I met Landis-sensei that I became close to Americans.

Paula: Why was it that your experience getting to know Americans—well, was that the first time? Or, did you have other American friends?

Hiroi: Ahh… there weren’t any others. I had met a few [Americans]. Umm… to make something for them, that is. Mm, that was about it, and I can’t really say that I became close to them. Even if I wanted to become friends with them I couldn’t. And also, at that time I was still poor, and I was putting all my effort into making a living. Mm, Americans were like an unattainable goal, hahaha. They’d do something and I’d be like “Whoaaa, amazing!” And when I met Landis-sensei, it was because we had a chance [to meet] on a television [show].

Photo - 016-01 [edit 1]
Hiroi and Janell on a television broadcast together.
Paula: Did you often introduce those Edo tops on that television program?

Hiroi: Yes, yes. I often did it.

Paula: Was that an NHK program?

Hiroi: I did it on NHK, too, and all of the Sendai broadcasting stations. I did all of them. I did broadcasts for the entire country on NHK and also local ones. I’ve done a lot of local shows and NHK shows, too. Also Tohoku Broadcasting. Mmm, even now I’m doing Miyagi Television’s OH! Bandesu program. They let me do that TV show a number of times. Even now I’m good friends with a man named Wakigaya-san from Miyagi Television, and Amano-san from Tohoku Broadcasting, he was a producer, I think. And Amano’s wife was a student of Landis-sensei. That was the relationship. And he said, “Next time I’ll introduce you to an American.” And then because there was free time, on a New Year’s TV program, this was a New Year’s TV program. And [Landis-sensei] and I did it together, and they told us they’d introduce us. Did we meet before that? Before the television show… hmmm… before the television show… ah, I had heard of her. Because they said they would introduce us, and we didn’t have a chance [before that]. And [they said] they’d have us do [the TV show] together. Mm, it was from that time.

[29:22]

Paula: What sort of television show was it?

Hiroi: It was a New Year’s show, and, err… what kind of things did we do? In any case it was things that were good luck for the New Year, and it was a show that also did Edo tops… I think. I don’t remember in detail what we did. What I remember is that the announcer kept getting things wrong and was corrected a lot. (laughs) I think Landis-sensei knew the whole time. Heh heh. We talked about it a lot.

Paula: This will go into [the topic of] Landis-san [again], but could you talk a bit about the first time you met her?

Hiroi: I think the first time I met Landis-sensei was when [we] were on television. I feel like I might have met her before that, but maybe I didn’t. I don’t remember that time well. The first… thing I remember is that time on TV, I think. But I might have met her before that. I don’t remember when that television show aired.

Anyway, she was a teacher at Miyagi Gakuin, and an American who was fluent in Japanese. And she had an interest in [things like tops], so [Amano-san] said he’d bring her next time. I heard this from the show’s producer, Amano-san. After that we met on the television show, which I saw in a photograph first. I feel like we met before that, but probably that was our first meeting. I don’t clearly remember that time. Anyway, it was around that time. And she came to my home, and was really happy [to see the tops]. And that was the first time she said she wanted to make them herself. She said “Please teach me,” so I taught her. Umm yeah that’s about right. It’s hard to remember. But she really made a lot of things, Landis-sensei did.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. That wagon, she made that wagon thing.

Hiroi: Yeah. What was interesting at that time was–

Mrs. Hiroi: The wagon.

Hiroi: Umm, yeah. It was a wagon, a covered wagon from the pioneering times like those you see in Western films. But attached to the wagon, I thought they were horses, but Landis-sensei put oxen. I said “Shouldn’t they be horses, not oxen?” and she said, “No, they’re really oxen.” When I said “Why?”, and she said that horses can go far but they get tired easily. Oxen were slow, but they had stamina for no matter how far they go, and so for going [that far], actually it’s not a carriage but an ox cart. And so she attached oxen to the covered wagon. Mm, even now, it’s amazing. That she made that. She made so many things. Later she used the lathe by herself, and that was Karahiro-chō, right?

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: There we made a cabin, a little cabin where we worked, and [made tops] there for a while. I think she [made tops] until she went back to America.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: Yeah, that’s it. She returned to America and sent her lathe there. And she said, “After I return to America I’ll [make tops] there, too,” and I said “No, you won’t remember the way to make the tools, won’t it be impossible?” and she said “No, I’ll be fine, I have friends who are skilled with machinery and cutlery, so if I ask them [when I have a problem,] I’ll get by somehow and it’ll be fine.” And she sent her lathe to America. When I asked some time ago that was the case.

Paula: Umm–

Hiroi: And– huh? I think she [worked on the lathe] a little in America. There are lathes in America, too, but they work a little different. And Americans find Japan’s lathes unusual, so they come to see them. Umm, actually in America, there’s a lathe association of some kind, something like a world lathe association. And there’s number of members and an association. And the president… she’s in a group that makes naruko kokeshi, and I invited the American lathe association president and her husband, the couple, and they came here. I think the wife was the president and her husband was the vice president. And there was a [cultural] exchange with the artisans who made naruko kokeshi. On their way back they stopped by here. And at that time they made these teeny tiny tops. They were tops about this big, they had become their specialty. And I thought “Man, I’ve been defeated!” and made even smaller ones. Ones this small. And I showed them to them and they said “Nope, I’ve lost!” Heh heh heh heh heh. I was like, “I wonnnnn!” Hahahaha. They burst out laughing and we shook hands. It was great fun to experience.

[21:34]

Paula: Were you hesitant to take on Janell as an apprentice? Did you have any concerns?

Hiroi: No, I didn’t really have any concerns. Mm. Actually, I thought, she’s not Japanese, and it would be wonderful if an American learned [how to make tops]. And Landis-sensei was the one. And she carved a kokeshi by hand herself, and showed me that, too. And said that she definitely wanted to carve using a lathe. And right away, on that very day, she used the lathe. And she learned a lot of things carving, but, we didn’t understand each other here and there. And it was funny, when it was a problem she’d go, “I don’t understand because I’m an American.” Heh heh heh heh. Everyone would give big belly laughs. Heh heh heh.

Paula: Was that the first time you had a foreign apprentice?

Hiroi: Yeah, that was the first time. Heh heh heh. Yeah.

 

廣井先生とジャネルの出会い, そして弟子入り

このインタビューでは廣井先生が仙台で放送された年始の番組でジャネルと初めて会ったときのことについて語っている。二人の友情の始まりや、弟子入りした独楽づくりの訓練の始まりについて話している。

====

[25:42]

ポーラ・カーティス:で、あのう、東京と比べると仙台ではアメリカに対する態度が違いましたか。

廣井道顕:いや東京に、は、アメ、アメリカ・・・の人たちでは東京では会ってないんですよね。仙台来てからなんですね。戦後だから。だこれ今言ったように戦争終わったのも知らずに山ん中にいたくらいですから。だから東京では全然アメリカの人には会っていないし、で戦後、仙台に来てからですね。で特にあのランディス先生に会ってから、アメリカの人たちと親しく、してもらって。

ポーラ:アメリカ人に親しく、あのう、なる経験はなんで、あのそれは初めてですか。それとも、他のアメリカ人の友達がいましたか。

廣井: あーそいつはいなかったですね。少し会った程度ですね、みんなね。あのう・・・何かやっぱり頼まれて作ってやったり。うーんそんな程度で、あまり親しくっていうことは、言葉がほら通じないから。あの親しくなりたくてもなれなかったっていうか。でこっちもまだ、その頃うんと貧しくて、その日、生きてくのが精一杯な状態で。うん、なかなかもうアメリカの人は高嶺の花で、えへへ。もうこうやって「わーすげー」って見てる程度だったの。ほんであのう、ランディス先生と知り合ったのは、ほらこのテレビ、がキッカケ、だったんですね。

テレビ番組での廣井とジャネル
テレビ番組での廣井とジャネル

ポーラ:よく、あのテレビの番組で、あの江戸独楽を紹介しましたか。

廣井:ええ。ええ。すいぶんやってましたね。

ポーラ:それはNHKのプログラムでしたか。

廣井:NHKでもやったし、あのう、仙台の放送局全部。全部やりましたね。NHKも全国放送もやったし、ローカルでも。ローカルではずいぶんNHKでもやってもらったし、あと東北放送とか。ううん、今でもあの宮城テレビ「OH!バンデス」ていうのやってて。その番組でも何度か取り上げてもらったし。で今でもあの宮城テレビのウキガヤさんという人親しく付き合ってるし、でこれが東北放送の今言ったアマノさん、があのう、プロデューサーだったのかな、東北放送で。であのう、そのアマノさんの奥さんがランディス先生の教え子で。うん、そんな関係で。であのう「今度、アメリカの人、紹介すっから」なんて言われてて。で、そのうち、んで、空いたからテレビお正月、これお正月の番組だったんですね。で一緒に出てもらうから、でその時紹介ですから、なんて言われて。その前に会ったのかな。テレビに出る前に・・・うーんと・・・テレビに出る前・・・あ、話に聞いてたんだな。紹介すっからって言われててなかなか機会がなくて。でテレビで、んで一緒に出てもらうからっていうことで。うん、その時以来の。

[29:22]

ポーラ:あのう、その番組はどのような内容でしたか。

廣井:だからお正月の番組で、えー内容どうだったのかな。とにかくあのーお正月の縁起のいいものっていうことで、この江戸独楽の紹介を兼ねて・・・の番組だったのかな。ちょっと内容までは、あまり詳しく覚えてないんですけど。覚えてんのはこのアナウンサーの人が間違えて何度もやり直しさせられたっていう。(laughs) ずっとねランディス先生も分かってると思うけどね。へへ。よく話しているね。

[Segment 3, 20:21]

ポーラ:で、少しあのランディスさんの話に入りますが、ランディスさんとの出会いについて少し話していただけませんか。

廣井:あぁ・・・。ランディス先生一番最初会ったのは、テレビのときかな?その前会ってる気もするんだけど、会っていないような気もするし。その辺よく分かってないけど。一番・・・覚えてるのはそのテレビのときかな。でもその前にも会ってっから。その、このテレビがいつ放送したんだか忘れたもんな。

とにかくあのう、宮城学院の先生で、アメリカの人で、日本語ペラペラな人だからっていうことで。で、うんとこういうものに興味がある人だから、今度連れて来るからって言う。ええと、そのプロデューサーやってた天野さんって方から聞いて。でその後、さっき写真で見たあのテレビの、番組で一緒になって。なんかその前にも会っているような気もするんだけど、多分そのときが初対面ではないような。その辺ちょっとハッキリしなんですけど。とにかくその頃ですね。であのう、うちに来て、見て、喜んでもらって。で自分でも作りたいって言い始めて。で教えてくれっていうから教えてやって。うんん、やっぱりなかなかね。覚えるのが大変で。そんでもね、いろんもの作ったよな、ランディス先生な。

夫人:うん。馬車は馬車のあれも作ったし。

廣井:うん。そのとき面白かったのが、

夫人:馬車ぐるま。

廣井:あのう、うん。馬車あのう、映画のあの西部劇に出てくる開拓時代の幌馬車。ところが幌馬車、馬かなと思ったら牛付けたんですよね、ランディス先生ね。で、牛でなくて、馬でねえの?っつったっけ、『いや、本当は牛なんだ』って。で、なんで?っつったっけ、馬は速いけどすぐに疲れる。牛は遅いけど、どこまででも、スタミナがあって、あの行くので、そんであの、本当は、馬車でなく牛車なんだ、なんてね。で幌馬車を作って、牛付けたの。うん、今でもあれば、すごいんだけどな。そういうのも作ったしね。いろんなもの作りましたよ、うん。あと、自分で轆轤を作って、あの片平町だよな?

夫人:うん。

廣井:あそこにあの、小屋、小屋一つ作ってそこに仕事場作って、しばらくそこでやってましたけどね。アメリカに帰る、までやってたのかな?

夫人:うん。

廣井:そうだね。でアメリカに帰るんでその轆轤はアメリカへもう送って。で『アメリカに帰ってからもやるんだ』なんて言うから 「いや、道具つくりだのも覚えてないからちょっと無理でねえの?」ったけど、『いや、大丈夫だ』なんて言って。 『友達で機械に詳しい人いるし。刃物に詳しい人もいるから、その人たちに頼めば、何とかなるから大丈夫だから』っていうことで。で轆轤アメリカに送ったんですけど。さっき聞いたらあるって言ってましたよね。

ポーラ:あのう―

廣井:で、うん?アメリカで少しやってた、みたいですけどね。なんか、アメリカにも轆轤はあるんですけど、あのやり方がちょっと違うんですよね。で日本の轆轤のあのやり方は、アメリカの人たち、珍しいからって前はよく、見学に来たりしてたみたいですけどね。であのう、アメリカの、やっぱりあの、こう、轆轤協会っていうのがあって、世界轆轤協会って言ったけな。でアメリカにもなんか、何人かで、協会があって。でその会長さんが・・・鳴子、のこけし組合で、アメリカのその轆轤協会の会長さんご夫妻、ご夫婦を呼んだんですよね。で来たことがあるんですけど。で奥さんが会長で、旦那が副会長っつったかな。そして鳴子のこけし工人の人たちと交流して。でその帰りに、ここへ来たんですよね。でそのときに、その・・・人が作った、こう、こんなちっちゃな独楽作ってきたのね。このくらいの大きさの独楽を作って、得意になって来たわけ。で「こんな、負けてらんないな」と思って、もっとちっちゃいの作ったのね。このくらいのやつを。で、見したっけ 『いや、参りました』なんて言って。へへへへへ。こっち「勝ったー!」なんて、へへへへへ。大笑いしてね。握手してね。えらい喜んでもらったことはありますね。

[21:34]

ポーラ:ランディスさんを弟子として受け入れるのをちゅうちょされましたか。何か心配ありましたか。

廣井:いや、何も心配はなかったですね。うん。やっぱりあのう、日本人でなくて、ね、アメリカの方に覚えてもらう方がいいことだなと思って。でランディス先生はあの通りだからね。で自分であのこけしなんかを作ってたの、こう手で削って。でそれも見せてもらったんですけど。で是非轆轤で削りたいんだっていうことで。うんではっつうんで早速、もうその日のうちに轆轤に乗せてやって。で削るの色々教えてやっ…たのはいいんだけど、この言葉がところどころ通じないところがあってね。で面白いのが都合が悪いと『私アメリカ人だから分かりません』って言うんだ、へへへへへ。あの時みんな腹抱えて大笑いだったもんな。へへへ。

ポーラ:それは、あの、その、外国人の弟子は、はじ、はじめて…?

廣井:うん、初めてですね。へへへ…ええ。

Hiroi’s early experiences as a woodworker

In this interview segment, Hiroi-sensei describes his early experiences as a woodworker in Sendai selling kokeshi dolls before he settled on reviving his family’s tradition of making Edo-style tops. He discusses the difficulties his family had selling their goods, despite being discovered as the last surviving family in Japan that made Edo-style tops.

This clip has been slightly edited from the original interview for clarity. A transcript of this clip can be found below. And a full transcript of our interview with Hiroi can be found here [forthcoming].

===========================================

Young Hiroi-sensei.
Young Hiroi-sensei.

Hiroi Michiaki: Hmmm. Since I first came to Sendai… mmm… there were many [moments that stay in my mind], my father worked in many woodworkers’ shops, and was an artisan. And from that he became independent, and rented a house himself and of course put a lathe in it, and worked wholesaling and subcontracting kokeshi. And, ahh around this time kokeshi, souvenir kokeshi that is, they’re different from the traditional style of kokeshi [you see] now. He was able to sell a lot of those. There was a wholesale shop, and there he subcontracted unpainted objects called shirakiji (blank wood), and worked doing that. And doing that, he said that if he was to make kokeshi he might as well do traditional kokeshi, and he became a person named Wagatsuma-san’s apprentice, and came to [make kokeshi] from the Toogatta kokeshi tradition. And then they were able to sell traditional kokeshi, and it became a kokeshi boom, and they became able to sell them. He took his lathe to Tokyo and [sold them] at performances and department stores. At first he did kokeshi, but kokeshi take a lot of time, so he did tops [instead].

Paula Curtis:   Yes.

Hiroi:   Then, in Tokyo, they said that along with Italy they were going to gather kokeshi. “Native toys” (kyōdō gangu) were [being gathered] here and there in Japan—if it’s Aizu, for example, they have the Akabeko (red cow). People came [here] that were collecting those kinds of native toys and kokeshi. Mmm I was doing tops, but at that time, since I was in Sendai I wasn’t doing Edo tops, but those called Sendai tops or Miyagi tops. Because they were [being sold] at goods shops in Sendai and Miyagi prefecture. And when I did that in Sendai [I made] Sendai tops, and when I was in Miyagi prefecture I did Miyagi ones, tops called Miyagi tops. And they were popular, since they were spinning right in front of you. The people who came to gather the native toys said something like “Where are you really from?” and I said “Actually I’m from Tokyo.” And they were like “Ahh of course!” They said, of course, we thought that in Tokyo, too, long ago there were lots of toys called “Edo tops (edogoma)” but no matter how much we looked, we couldn’t find them. When they said “Have you made them?” I said something like “My family has traditionally done them.” He said, “Ahh! I found them!!” and there was a clamor about it in Tokyo, saying they finally found Edo tops. And my younger brother went to Tokyo. My brother got married in Tokyo and has done Edo tops there ever since. When he has a chance he makes Edo tops here in Sendai. Well, in Sendai, too, to a certain extent we made Edo tops, but people here didn’t understand about them, so even if we sold them they didn’t sell well.

Paula:   Did your family expect you to continue business as a top-maker?

Hiroi:    Mm, that was the only thing to do. Somehow I sold the tops. Like in the past, I thought I might not be able to eat, and in Sendai, just like back then, I wasn’t understood, and I couldn’t sell anything. And I went to Tokyo and it was a situation like I just described, and so I was able to sell my tops there. Though, at that time, rather than Edo tops I actually was working hardest at making the traditional kokeshi.

Paula:    When did you become an independent Edo top maker?

Hiroi:   Hmm… when was it? I don’t remember exactly. Mm… I didn’t really become aware of [when I started working independently, because] I was helping my father. And at some point I started using the lathe. So I don’t exactly what year, what month, what day–it wasn’t like that.

Paula:    About how many years were you an apprentice?

Hiroi:   Mmm, I don’t really know that either… It happens before you know it. At some point I was helping my father and working with my brother, and the three of us came to work together. What year, month, day–it wasn’t set. So I don’t really know how long [I was an apprentice].

Paula:    This is a bit similar to the previous question, but when did you first come to Sendai?

Hiroi:   When I first came to Sendai… Shōwa–What year was it? Twenty-three. It must have been Shōwa 23 [1948].

Paula:    What was your life like there?

Hiroi:    Mmm that time… we rented a room in someone’s house. Rented [just] a room. So how would [you say] we lived, I wonder? Somehow it’s weird to think of it as [properly] living there, but my father was working hard. And… at any rate we went back and forth all over within Sendai. We hadn’t been there long, so [we went] here and there. So even within Sendai we lived in a number of places… One, two, three, four, five, six, seven. We moved seven times.

Paula:   That was before you were married?

Hiroi:    Before.

Paula:    And after you were married…?

Hiroi:   After I was married… umm… After I was married… Ahh. It was once or twice [that we moved]. To here. Umm… in Higashiguchi, Higashi… We got married at the town Higashi shichiban, and moved to Fukurobara, and here. It was twice [until] we were here.

Paula:    In Sendai, well, what sort of memories do you have of the various places [you lived]? Are there any that stand out?

Hiroi:    Mmm I have unpleasant memories, you know. (laughs) There were two places. Really terrible ones, two places where I was bullied, awful places I experienced. But after that, they were all enjoyable. Especially after I was independent. Umm… I had many friends, and it was nice that there were many people my age. It was really fun. In one place, for some reason in one place almost all of the kokeshi makers in Sendai gathered together, and I lived independently and felt like it was a neighborhood community, and there were lots of people doing the same work so it was nice. Even now looking back on it, it was a really a great time [in my life]. And that [time], the son of the sensei who taught kokeshi-making back then, he’s alive now, and even now he’s always saying “That was the best time, wasn’t it?” It was really great.