Tag Archives: top

Janell’s Tops: Part 3

While Janell was an apprentice to Hiroi-sensei, he encouraged her to produce tops that dealt with themes related to American folk culture and lore that reflected both her background and the art and culture of her new home through traditional Japanese crafts. The photos below show tops Janell made in the 1980s. There are both western-themed tops and traditional Japanese tops.

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Newspaper article 新聞記事: Moved from Toshima, To Train in Akiu: Maeda from the Izu Islands

Hiroi-sensei and Maeda-san have appeared many times in Japanese newspapers. Below is a translation of an article entitled “Moved from Toshima, To Train in Akiu: Maeda from the Izu Islands” that ran January 10, 2008 in the newspaper Kahoku shinpō. See the original Japanese article at the link below.

廣井先生と前田さんは多数の新聞記事で特集されています。2008年1月10日、河北新報が廣井先生についての記事を掲載しました。以下のリンクでアクセスできます。

Click here for the original article: 記事はこちら

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Kahoku shinpō (January 10, 2008)

Maeda makes traditional artworks using reclaimed camellia wood, which is difficult to work with.

Moved from Toshima, To Train in Akiu: Maeda from the Izu Islands

“I want to become a woodworker using camellia wood in my hometown”

Akiu Craft Village in the Taihaku Ward of Sendai City and the Izu Islands near Tokyo are forming a closer bond. A man from Toshima has moved to Akiu and is training in traditional crafts. Given the opportunity to use reclaimed camellia wood from the Izu islands during his training at Akiu Craft Village, in the future, he hopes to return to his hometown as a woodworker specializing in their local camellia wood. For Akiu, they can also greatly increase the assortment of products they make, and their craftspeople have responded warmly, saying, “We this to become a bridge between Akiu and isolated islands of the Pacific.”

This man is Maeda Ryōji (26). While working a part-time job at a gas station in Sendai, he commutes to the “Komaya [Top Shop] Hiroi” workshop and is learning how to make tea cups, saucers, and tops.

The Hiroi workshop is managed by Hiroi Michiaki (74), one of the seven artisans of the Akiu Craft Village Work Association.

Maeda, after helping with his parent’s fishing business, worked at a company in Tokyo. In spring of 2004, he came to sell camellia oil at a product fair in Akiu Craft Village, where he by chance met Hiroi and developed an interest in traditional arts. In fall, he moved to Sendai.

Maeda says that his dream is “to master [everything], from methods of sawing to the making of ten types of edged tools using the lathe, then become the only woodworker in Toshima.”

In 2004, at the suggestion of local planner Aizawa Yū (51, Izumi Ward), the Work Association began a project to create new traditional craft pieces using reclaimed wood from Toshima. They received a donation of camellia wood from Toshima village and began their exchange selling kokeshi and accessory cases they made from it.

Compared with dogwood and other trees used for wooden toys, camellia has numerous hidden knots in the wood and becomes extremely hard when dried, making it difficult to work with. The products made from camellia have a particular texture and tint to them that give them a high-quality feeling.

Aizawa has said, “I thought we would join forces—Toshima, which had an issue with disposing of its old camellia wood, and the Craft Village, which was looking for a new challenge. We would be happy if Maeda became an independent craftsperson and inherited our traditional craft techniques.”

A map of Toshima 利島 off the coast of Tokyo and Yokohama.

“I don’t think there are any woodworkers in Japan that use camellia. I want to guide Maeda so he can readily become an independent artisan,” Hiroi said enthusiastically.

Toshima 利島 is located 140 km south of Tokyo. The population of the island, which spans about 8 km in circumference,  is around 300 people. More than half the island is covered with around 200,000 camellia trees, whichproduced about 14.5 kiloleters (3830.5 gallons) of camellia oil from their seeds a year in 2006–an estimated 60% of all of Japan’s camellia oil.

 

Media Post メディアポスト: Hiroi at Work 働く廣井先生

Creating Edogoma involves careful work within the workshop. Hiroi-sensei creates his own tools and spends hours at the lathe carving and painting his tops. The following photos show Hiroi-sensei at work in his small workshop at the front of his store and home in Akiu Craft Village.

江戸独楽の製作には工房での慎重な作業が求められる。廣井先生は自作の道具と旋盤を使い、何時間もかけて独楽を削り出して色付けする。秋保工芸の里にある独楽店の前には、廣井先生の自宅兼工房がある。こちらは小さな工房で働く廣井先生の写真である。

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Title:

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This top does not have a particular title, and Hiroi-sensei does not remember anything about it.

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Hiroi Michiaki: I don’t know what this is. I didn’t know [before either]. Mm. It’s pretty big isn’t it? Mm. I don’t quite know, though. I don’t know. It’s a top that comes to a point, huh.

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タイトル:

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この独楽には特に題名はなく、作った本人である廣井先生もあまりこの独楽に関して覚えていないそう。

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廣井道顕:これが分からないんだよね。これが分からなかったんだなぁ。うん。かなりでかいもんだなぁ。これがね、ちょっと分からないですけどね。分かんないんだな。とんがった独楽だな。

 

Hiroi-sensei and his apprentices

In this post, Hiroi-sensei highlights his own experiences as an apprentice and the many years he instructed others. He describes the apprenticing process and the years of dedication necessary to become a master top-maker.

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Paula Curtis: And to continue, can you tell us a little about your experience as an apprentice?

Hiroi Michiaki: As an apprentice?

Paula: Yes, um, such as, when you were an Edo top apprentice and first began learning it, what was the most difficult thing, for example. Could you explain a bit about that experience?

Hiroi: Ahh… yes. The most difficult thing was whether a top would spin well or not. At the beginning I didn’t know what I should do to make it spin well. That was definitely the most difficult thing. It’s still hard now, though, it’s still difficult. How it will spin, how I should produce it to get different ways of moving; since the many ways it moves depend on the strength of the top. That foundation… making the top so that it spins, that’s the most [difficult]. A lot of years… it takes a lot of years [to learn], you know. Even now it’s the same. That’s really the most difficult thing.

Paula: Even now, um–

Hiroi: Even now.

Paula: Even now, do your apprentices think that is the most difficult thing [to learn]?

Hiroi: Ahh, I don’t know what my apprentices think. I think it’s probably the same, though. And for tops, you know right away. Whether it’s good or bad. No matter how many you make with this shape, if you spin it and watch and it goes rattling about, it’s not a good one. So that’s the most difficult part. I think my apprentices probably have that same worry, even now, worried [about how they spin].

Paula: When did you first start accepting apprentices?

Hiroi: Mm, when was my first apprentice…?  Ahh, it was after we came to Fukuhara, right. Umm it was some years ago… mm, it was some years ago so I’ve forgotten. Quite a while back. It was before we came here, so we came here at least twenty-five years ago, and it was before that, so about thirty years ago, I think.

Paula: How many apprentices do you usually have?

Hiroi: At first it was one. And I mentioned this before, but that apprentice had a lot of friends and brought seven people with him, so, yeah, it was when we were in Fukuhara, so before we came here.

Paula: Um, when Janell came here to learn about these Edo tops, did you have [other] apprentices did you have at that time?

Hiroi: At that time… ah! I already had some apprentices, seven of them. The apprentices from Shiroishi were already here at that time. And in addition to them, um, there were a number of people, umm, who like Landis-sensei came here to learn as a hobby… Amano-san, Jin-san… umm… Suzuki-san, Zanma-san… ahh, also there was Shimamura-san, Watanabe-san… who else was there… Amano-san, Jin-san… Junna-san, Suzuki-san… and… Ah! Today, err? Kyōya-san, was he around that time? When we were in Fukuhara. Kyōya-san…

Mrs. Hiroi: Also there was the Jins.

Hiroi: So, Amano-san, Jin-san, and Zanma-san, Suzuki-san, Kyōma-san…

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. That’s about it.

Hiroi: That was about all the people doing it as a hobby. Ah, and Landis-sensei, too.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. So that’s about it.

Hiroi: Six people doing it as a hobby. And other than them, there were people doing it professionally… Ah, Shinomura-san was doing it for a hobby at first, and from that beginning went pro.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: So other than the seven from Shiroishi that I said before, the people who became professionals were the two from Marumori and today’s Tome. Umm, seven people plus two people, so nine.

Mrs. Hiroi: Mm.

Hiroi: Nine people, these were those aiming at being pros and who were pros. And the other six were amateurs doing it as a hobby. So in all there was ten– ah, there was also Morimoto-san.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. There was also Morimoto-san.

Hiroi: Right. In that case there was a lot. Fifteen or sixteen. Heh heh heh. So there was a turnover.

[7:13]

Paula: And were you apprentices usually men? Women?

Hiroi: Female apprentices. Umm with Landis-sensei as the first, then there was Jin-san’s wife. And… there was Yamada-san. Umm… female apprentices…

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah… yeah… that was about it.

Hiroi: Is that about it? I thought there was someone else…

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. There weren’t [that many] women.

Hiroi: Only three? It was three women.

Paula: Going pro…?

Hiroi: Mmm… probably…

Paula: Was there no one?

Hiroi: There was no one who went pro that was a hobbyist, but there are people above pro. But that doesn’t mean that they’re making a living from it…

Paula: About how old were people who became apprentices? At the beginning, at the beginning–

Hiroi: When they first came?

Paula: Yeah.

Hiroi: How old were they? Around that time I think everyone was in their thirties.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: Yeah… it was their thirties. Yeah. Among the men, who was the oldest?

Mrs. Hiroi: Around that time wasn’t there Minoru-kun?

Hiroi: Minoru-kun was so young at that time.

Mrs. Hiroi: Was he that young?

Hiroi: He was still a child.

Mrs. Hiroi: Was he?

Hiroi: Yeah, yeah, was he in his twenties? [Or] in his thirties.

Mrs. Hiroi: Uh, who, who was?

Hiroi: Was he in his thirties? Yeah, everyone was, weren’t they?

Mrs. Hiroi: That’s how it was. Yeah.

Hiroi: The oldest person… ah, was it Watanabe-san? Mm. Watanabe-san was the oldest. He was from a place called Marumori. And he was interesting, I have a story about him. His younger sister’s husband, he was from Marumori. And this sister, the man she married, her husband, he was the chauffeur for the mayor of Marumori. And I was often told that in Marumori they didn’t have any special [local] products, so they wanted me to make something. And at that time, when they said “Let’s make something!” in Marumori, there was one person who made kokeshi, and they asked him if he’d make them something. I spoke with them about it, but ahh– “bring him along”– [no,] I think they said to bring what I’d made and show them to see what they were.

Mrs. Hiroi: Mm. Yeah.

Hiroi: Then I brought my goods, but they were the [amusing] sort you laugh at. And that guy was someone who specialized in making a new kind of kokeshi using unfinished wood; it seems that he didn’t make them himself, but he made the unfinished wood to order, and didn’t have any experience making them himself. And I brought him with me, and at the time, because they came from the town hall… did the mayor come? The mayor, and– ah, no, it was the deputy mayor.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. The deputy mayor.

Hiroi: The deputy mayor and… umm, the section chief of the commerce and industry division. I think three people came.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. Three people came.

Hiroi:  I wonder if the mayor came… In any case, three people from the town hall came to my home with his younger sister’s husband. And they came saying that they had thought about something that could be the special local product of Marumori, and [asked] whether I had anything good. At that time, uhh, and then, the thing I made was, umm, this sort of… is there a pencil? Umm, this kind of shape… [drawing]  and here there’s… this top with three [other tops] attached.

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah. Three [tops] attached to it.

Hiroi: It’s in this shape, one, two, three. I made this kind of top… and I made this kind of top, but they didn’t understand what it was for some reason. In Japanese, it’s “marui” (round), round and there’s three trees. There are three trees in the round place, so it becomes “Marumori.” [translator’s note: the town’s name, Marumori, is comprised of the kanji for “round” and for “forest.” The character for “forest,” mori 森,  is made up of three of the “tree” kanji (木), making this a pun on three round objects representing trees becoming a “round forest,” or “marumori,” the town name.]

And I made this top and show it to them and the people from town hall were surprised and said, “Ohh, this is great!” So they took it and had the person I mentioned before, Watanabe-san, make it, and it’s [now] sold as Marumori’s special product. They’re [still] making it now. They’re still making it now, though I don’t know where they’re selling it, but I hear it’s still made somewhere. So a few might still be sold somewhere, but I don’t know. I don’t know how they’re selling it. But at that time, for the first time I met Watanabe-san, and the people from town hall said that they definitely wanted me to make him an apprentice and teach him. When he came, he was quite a different age than you, wasn’t he?

Mrs. Hiroi: Yeah.

Hiroi: He was the oldest [of the apprentices]. He also had a lot of experience. Even now there are a lot of shops that have the products he’s made. He might come here directly today. Yesterday he called and he said he might come. He was the oldest.

Paula: How many years are your apprentices apprenticed to you before they become independent top-makers?

Hiroi: Umm, in the end it takes ten years. Of course, it takes half a year or a year to learn the lathe. And then there’s a lot to remember. Even for someone like Maeda-kun, who can do it all now, it took ten years. It takes ten years.

Paula: Did you have any foreign apprentices after that?

Hiroi: No, after that, I didn’t any apprentices, but the people who came because they liked it were those that Landis-sensei introduced to me. They were her friends, and Newton-san, Landis-sensei had– what was it? Was he from Shichigahama? Takayama? After she returned to America, Newton-san joined [my workshop]. Newton-san came to my home for a while, but I think he moved somewhere before the [Tōhoku] earthquake. It was that he moved to Okayama or somewhere shortly after, right? So I think he wasn’t around for the earthquake, the tsunami.

And other than him, there was a person from Sweden, a person from Denmark, and– where was it? Was he Japanese? And there was another person. An American. Someone related to [Janell’s] church, I think. And they gave me wooden clogs or something. Clogs from Sweden or Denmark– I thought they were from Holland and they were like “No, you’re wrong!” and “Mine are the real thing.” I have the clogs somewhere, I could find them if I looked. And often when they came, they’d make me cherry-shaped [tops]. They said it was because they loved cherries, [so they made] cherry-shaped tops. If you travel to Sweden and Denmark, they have purple and yellow cherries, not just red ones. So I asked them to [make tops] in all kinds of colors. So they did, and I was delighted.

But they didn’t become apprentices. In that time, ummm… their term [of office], they had to switch jobs, so they had to go back to their countries. So both of them had to go back to their countries at the same time, and I never met them again. And one more person, who was it? Newton-san came every day, didn’t he? Until he moved to Okayama. He came until the earthquake happened. So he must have moved to Okayama just before that. And Landis-sensei brought him. Yeah, and Landis-sensei told him to become an apprentice, and he half-wanted to, but it was impossible for me [to make him do it]. Heh heh heh. He didn’t become an apprentice. He was a handsome person. Heh heh heh. When you met him you were like “Whoooa.” Hahahaha.

[25:50]

 

廣井先生と弟子

廣井先生自身が見習いだった時の経験や、長く弟子に独楽づくりを教えていた年月について語っている。弟子入りのプロセスや独楽職人となるために必要な年数などについて説明している。

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ポーラ・カーティス:で、続いて、あのう、先生の弟子としての経験を、ま、少し説明していただけませんか。

廣井道顕:弟子としてのって?

ポーラ:はい、あのう、江戸独楽の弟子として、ま、最初に習ったときは、まあ、先生には一番難しいところはなんでしたかとか、そのような経験について少し説明していだたけませんか。

廣井:あぁ・・・はい。一番難しかったのはね、独楽がよく回るか回らないか。どうしたらよく回るのかなぁっていうのが、最初よく分らなくて。難しかったのは、それが一番ですね。それは今も、そうなんですけど、同じなんですけど。いかによく回して、どう、いろんな動きが、その独楽の力によって、いろんな動きを、こう作り出すっていうか。それの基本・・・が、その、独楽が回るように作るっていう、それが一番、何年も・・・あー、何年もどころでないね。未だに、そうなんですけども。それがやっぱり一番難しかったですね。

ポーラ:今も、あのう―

廣井:今も。

ポーラ:先生の弟子は、あの、今も先生の弟子は同じところが一番難しいと、あの、思っていますか。

廣井:あぁ、弟子たちはどう思ってるか、分らないですけど。多分同じ、だと思うんですけどね。で、独楽の場合は、すぐ分るんですよね。よし、良い悪いが。いくらこう形ができても、回してみるとガタガタになってれば、ね、いいもんでもないし。だからその点がね、一番難しいところで。多分今も弟子たちも同じ悩みに、悩んでると思うんですけどね。

ポーラ:先生は初めて弟子を受け入れる時はいつでしたか。

廣井:ええ、はじめて弟子を・・・いつごろなんだ?あぁ、袋原に行ってからだよな。ううんとね、何年前だ・・・ううん、何年前だか忘れてしまったので。結構前ですね。ここへ来る前ですから、ここへ来てもう、二十五年になるから、その前だから、三十年ぐらい前かな。

ポーラ:普通は弟子何人いますか。

廣井:最初は一人。で、さっきも話したけど、その弟子が、あの仲間をいっぱい、七人連れてきたのが、ええ、やっぱり袋原にいるとき、こっちに来る前ですね。

ポーラ:あのう、ジャネルさんがここで、あの、あの、この江戸独楽について、学びましたときは、そのときは、弟子何人いましたか。

廣井:そのときは・・・あっ、もういたんだね、七人。白石から来た弟子たちが、もういましたね、そのとき。でその他に、あのう、趣味で、ランディス先生みたく、趣味で習いに来てた弟子が、うーんと、あんとき何人いたんだ・・・天野さん、神(じん)さん・・・うんと・・・鈴木さん、残間(ざんま)さん・・・あぁ、あとは島村さん、渡辺さんとか・・・あと誰がいる・・・天野さん、神さん、・・・純名(じゅんな)さん、鈴木さん・・・いやあと、あっ!きょう、ん?京谷(きょうや)さんその頃だっけか。袋原にいるときだ。きょうやさん・・・

夫人:あとほら、神さんたち。

廣井:だから、天野さん、神さん、それから、残間さん、鈴木さん、京谷さん・・・

夫人:うん。それぐらいだよ。

廣井:趣味の人そんなもんだっけ。あぁ、でランディス先生もさ。

夫人:うん。んだ、それぐらいだ。

廣井:趣味、の人が六人。でその他に、プロの・・・あっ、篠村さん最初は趣味で、あぁ、最初からプロになるって来たんだっけか、篠村さんが。

夫人:うん。

廣井:だからプロになるっていう人が、今言ったの白石の七人の他に、あと丸森からと、あとそれから、今の登米からと、二人、参加しているから。ええと、七人と二人、九人か。

夫人:うん。

廣井:九人、これはプロを目指して、プロだった人で。であとの六人はあの趣味でアマチュアで。だから全部で十、あ、森本さんもいたな。

夫人:うん。んだ、森本さんいた。

廣井:だな。そうすっと何人なんだ。十五・六人いたね。へへへ。だから入れ替わり立ち替わり来たんだよな。

[7:13]

ポーラ:で、あの先生の弟子はたいてい男性ですか、女性ですか。

廣井:女性の弟子はね。ええとまずランディス先生はじめとして、じんさんの奥さんだべ。それから・・・山田さんがいたか。ええと・・・女性の弟子は・・・

夫人:うん・・・うん・・・それぐらいだっちゃ。

廣井:そんなものか。あれなんかもっと誰がいたような・・・

夫人:うん。女でいねえっちゃわ。

廣井:三人だけか。女性三人ですね。

ポーラ:プロまでは、あのう・・・

廣井:うんん・・・やっぱり・・・

ポーラ:誰もいないんですか。

廣井:趣味の人はまだプロになった人はいないんですけど、プロ以上の人はいるんですよ。でもそれで、それで生活してるわけではないんですけど・・・

ポーラ:弟子になる人は何歳ぐらいですか。はじめ、はじめ―

廣井:初め来たとき?

ポーラ:はい。

廣井:何歳ぐらいで。あの頃みな三十代かな。

夫人:うん。

廣井:そうだな・・・三十代でした、ね。うん。男性の場合は、一番、年かさの人は誰だ。

夫人:うん。あのあたりんときみのるくんあたりでなかった?

廣井:みのるくんだからずっと若いべあの頃。

夫人:若いかったがいや?

廣井:まだ子供だ。

夫人:んだっけか?

廣井:そうそう二十代だべ。三十代だ。

夫人:で、誰、誰だべ?

廣井:三十ぐらいになってたのか。やっぱみな三十代だな。

夫人:なってたんだっちゃ。うん。

廣井:一番年上の人・・・あ、渡辺さんか。うん。渡辺さんって人が一番年上。これはあの、丸森っていうところ、の人なんですけど。うんとね、その人も面白いちょっと話があるんですけど。その人はね、こいつの妹の旦那が、これ丸森出身なんですけど。で、この妹の、結婚した相手の旦那さまが、旦那が、あの町長の丸森町の、町長の運転手をやってたのね。そんであのう、丸森に何もこう名物がないから、何か作りたいんだって話が、よく聞かされてたんだって。であのう、あるときね、そんであの、丸森で、何か作ろうっていう話になったときに、あのう、こけしをやってる人が一人いるっていうことで、でその人に何か作ってもらうかっていうことになって。で話をしたんだけど。あぁ、連れてこい、あ、作った品物どんなんだか見してくれって言ったのかな。

夫人:うん。そう。

廣井:そしたら品物を持って来たんだけど、なんかちょっと笑っちゃうような、品物で。あのう、その人は新型のこけしの、白木を専門でやってた人で、自分で作ったわけでなくて、注文出て白木を作ってた人で、自分で何かを作ったっていう経験はなかったみたいなのね。でね、その人を連れて、来るからっていうことで、役場のあのときは・・・町長が来たんだっけか?役場の町長と、あぁ違う。助役だ。

夫人:うん。助役だ。

廣井:助役と・・・うんと商工課の、課長だか。なんか三人来たような気がするな。

夫人:うん、三人来たな。

廣井:町長も来たのかな・・・とにかく三人で役場の人が、こいつの妹の旦那が連れて、うちに来たのね。そしてあのう、丸森の名物になるようなものを、うん、考えているだけど、何か良い物ないですかって来られて。そのときにね、んで、あの、ではっつうんで、作ってやったのは、ええとね、こういう、あれ鉛筆ねぇかな・・・。うんとね、こういう形の・・・こういうところに・・・うん、こういう独楽をここに三つくっ付けたんですよ。

夫人:うん、三つくっ付けた。

廣井:こう一、二、三って、こういう形に。こういう独楽をね、作ってやったのね・・・・・・で、こういうの作ってやったけ、その人たち何だか分からなかったの。んでね、これあの日本語にすると、丸い、これも丸い・・・丸い、木が三つだから。丸いところに木が三つだから、丸森となるんですよ。

で、これを作って見してやったっけ、その人、役場の人たちがビックリして、わぁこれは良いっていうことで。ほんで持って行って、でその今言った渡辺さんっていう人に作らせて、丸森名物として、売り出して。で今も作ってるっつったな。なんか今も作って、どこで売ってるかは分かんないんですけど、なんか、今でも作ってるそうです。だから、少しずつは売れてるのかも分かんないね。どういう売り方してっかは分からないんですけど。でそのとき、初めて、その渡辺さんって方と会って、で是非、あの弟子にして、教えてほしいって役場の人にも頼まれて。で来たら、お前とといくらも歳違わないんだよな。

夫人:うん。

廣井:でその人が一番年上だし、経験もいっぱいある人で。今も、その人の作った品物店にいっぱい置いてあるんですけども。もしかすっと今日来るかも分かんないね。きのう電話でなんか今日、来るようなこと言ってたな。その人一番上ですね。

ポーラ:で、江戸独楽の弟子から職人、ま、個人の職人までの過程は何年ぐらいかかりますでしょうか。

廣井:ううん、やっぱり十年はかかりますね、どうしてもね。であのう轆轤にのって削れるようになるのにやっぱり半年、一年はかかるしね。それから、色々なものを覚えて。やっぱり何でもできる前田君みたく今、今の前田君だって十年かかってますからね。十年かかりますね。

ポーラ:そのときから他の外国人の弟子はいましたか。

廣井:いやその後は、弟子になった人はいないけども、あの好きで集めてくれた人は、やっぱりランディス先生の紹介で来たのかな。ランディス先生の友達でね、ニュートンさんって方が、でランディス先生がほらあの、七ヶ浜のあそこ何だ高山?アメリカに帰った後に、ニュートンさんが入ったんですけど。ニュートンさんしばらくうちに来てたんだけど、地震なる前にどっか引っ越したのかな。あぁ岡山だかどっかに移るんだって言ってたんだよな。だから地震には遭わなかった気がするんですけどね、津波にはね。

でその他にはあの、スウェーデンの方と、デンマークの方と、あとどこだっけ…えぇどこの国の人だっけな。あぁそれともう一人いたんだよな。アメリカの人かな。まぁ教会関係の、人みたい。であの、木靴なんかもらったね、デンマークだか、スウェーデンだかの…木靴っていうのはオランダのかなと思ったら『違うんだ』なんて。『私の方が本場です』なんて。木靴どこかにあるんだよな、探せばあるんだけども。でよく、あの来るとねあの、さくらんぼ作ってあげたのね。なんかさくらんぼ、チェリーが好きだからってんで、そのチェリーの独楽。したっけ、あのスウェーデンだかデンマークの方行くと、赤ばかりでなくて紫のもあるし黄色のもあるし、色々あるんだからなんて。いろんな色を付けてくれって。でいろんな色を付けてあげて、喜ばれたことがありますけどね。

ただ、弟子にまではならなかったなあ。でそのうち、なんか…ううん、でなんか時間、任期切れとか何だかで、国に帰らなきゃならないんだって。で二人、デンマークの人とスウェーデンの人を二人同時期に、国に帰ってしまって、それ以外会ってないですけどね。もう一人ね、だれ、なんつったか、あのニュートンさんは毎日来たんだよな、あの岡山に移る前、まで。んで地震が、起こる前までは来てたんですけど。だから多分あれ、すれすれで岡山行ったかも分からないよな。でニュートンさんは、あそうだランディス先生が連れてきたんだ。そうだそれであの、弟子になれってランディス先生に言われて、半分その気になったんだけど、私には無理ですっつうて。へへへ。弟子にはならなかったんだな。きれいな人でね。へへへ。会うとポーとするんだ。あはははは。

[25:50]

 

 

巣ごもり (nesting)

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Title:

巣ごもり (sugomori)
nesting

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These tops depict a bird with its eggs in a nest. The eggs are red and white, which are traditionally lucky colors. The bird is a type of top called an “unkind” ijiwaru 意地悪 top, because it is especially difficult to spin.

99-2
Click to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hiroi Michiaki: And this is, “nesting,” I think? It’s nesting.

Paula Curtis: It’s the same as this one here.

Hiroi Michiaki: Ahh yeah yeah yeah yeah. This is an egg. Red and white eggs? Ahh, yes, yes, that’s it. And it’s an ijiwaru [unkind]* one.

*[Editor’s note: This is a type of top known as an “unkind” top, because it is especially difficult to spin.]