Category Archives: video

うん (un)

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Title:

うん (un)
un

=====================

This top depicts Momotarō, sometimes translated as “The Peach Boy,” or “Peach Tarō,” a legendary figure originating in the Edo period (1600-1868). In many versions of the Momotarō legend, Momotarō is a boy who came to Earth inside a giant peach who is discovered by an elderly couple who then raise him. He later leaves his home to fight a band of demons on a distant island, meeting a talking dog, a monkey, and a pheasant on the way who joint him in his quest. Most versions of the legend end with Momotarō defeating the demons, taking their treasure and their chief captive, and then returning home to live happily ever after with his parents.

In this top, Momotarō is very nervous to go fight the demons and has to go to the bathroom. He’s trying very hard to go and looks like he is going to wet himself. If you spin it properly the bottom drops out. There is a play on words with the title “un,” which sounds like a person struggling to go to the bathroom, and the character un 運, which means “luck,” so this is also called an unkoma or “luck top.”

***

***

Hiroi Michiaki: This is an interesting one. It’s Momotaro and I think there’s another one around here somewhere that has an oni (ogre). Umm, there was one with an oni earlier and it has an interesting story. There’s no oni on this one, I think. Huh? I think there was an oni. Somewhere. Ahh, it’s different than the oni.

This is from before Momotaro goes to the island of demons to exterminate them. Before that he’s extremely nervous and has to go to the bathroom. Heh heh heh. He’s trying really hard. If you spin it, it plops from the bottom. It will come out of ones that are made well. You spin it. In Japan, if you do that, it’s good luck. It’s called an unkoma 運独楽 (luck top). It’s said you’re spinning luck. And another [meaning here] is that the next time there’s an oni battle, Momotaro is coming to fight them, and he’s nervous and feels like he’s going to wet himself, and [the top] rattles about like this like he’s going to [pee himself]. I think the oni [top] is somewhere in here.  

 

Advertisements

うん

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

タイトル:

うん (un)
un

=====================

江戸時代(1600-1868年)が起源の伝説上のキャラクター、桃太郎を表現した独楽である。桃太郎の伝説には様々な種類の話があるが、どの話でも桃太郎は巨大な桃から生まれ、桃を見つけた老夫婦に育てられている。後に遠くの島にいる鬼を退治するために家を離れ、その道中で出会った話しのできる犬、猿、キジを鬼退治の仲間に引き入れる。どの話でも桃太郎が鬼を倒し、鬼の親玉を捕らえ、宝を持ち帰って育ての親である老夫婦と幸せに暮らすという終わり方をしている。

この独楽は、鬼退治に行く桃太郎がとても緊張してしまい、お手洗いに行かなければならなくなった姿を表現している。一生懸命に頑張っているが、今にもおもらししてしまいそうな姿である。この独楽をちゃんと回すことができると、独楽の下の部分が外れる。独楽の題名である『うん』は洒落になっている。お手洗いで力んで頑張っている時に出す『うーん』という声と、幸運の運をかけた言葉遊びで、うん(運)独楽としている。

***

***

廣井道顕:これが面白いんだ。これが、桃太郎でもう一つね、どこかにあると思うんだけど。鬼があるんですけど。うんと先に鬼があると話が面白いんだよな。こっちに鬼なかったかな。あれ鬼あったよな。どっかにな。あぁ、この鬼とは違うな。

これはね。桃太郎が鬼が島へ鬼退治にに行く、前の。前であの、緊張のあまり、トイレに行きたくなってる。へへへ。このとき、頑張ってるのね。回すと、この下からポトンと。形の良いのが出てくる。で回るのね。で日本の場合、そうすると、縁起がいいんです。運独楽つってね。うんが回るっていうことで。でもう一つね、鬼の方が、今度せめ、桃太郎が攻めてくるっていうんで、ビビって、おしっこもらしそうなって、こうやってバタバタしてるのと組みなんです。その、そっちの方の鬼がまだこっちにあるのかな。

 

いざり入道 (Izari nyūdō)

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Title:

いざり入道 (izari nyūdō)
Izari nyūdō

=====================

This top depicts an obake (monster) named Izari nyūdō. When this top is spun, the monster appears to walk menacingly toward you. The word izaru いざる, from which the name of the top comes, means “to shuffle/crawl.” Nyūdō 入道 is a term often used for monks. In folklore, a large number of supernatural creatures appear to be monks before they transform into their monster selves, leading to this term often being used for various types of obake.

***

***

Hiroi Michiaki: Umm, this is actually an obake (monster). It’s called Izari nyūdō. This one has an interesting way of moving. If you spin it, it goes like this and this and this, like it’s walking, and the monster seems to come at you.

いざり入道

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

タイトル:

いざり入道 (izari nyūdō)
Izari nyūdō

=====================

お化けのいざり入道がテーマの独楽である。独楽を回すと、お化けの入道が自分に向かってくるように回る。「いざる」という言葉は引きずって歩く、腹ばいで歩く・進む、という意味の言葉から来ている。入道は僧侶に使われる言葉である。民話の中で、僧侶が妖怪となる話が多くあり、そのため僧侶に関連するような言葉がさまざまなお化けの名前に使われるようになったと考えられる。

***

***

廣井道顕:ううん、これはね、やっぱりお化けだね。いざり入道っつって。これが面白い動きするのね。こう回すとこう、こういうふうに、こういうふうに、こういうふうに、こう、歩くような形で、お化けだどーって出てくる感じ。

 

だるま (daruma)

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Title:

だるま (daruma)
daruma

=====================

This work depicts a daruma. A daruma is a traditional Japanese doll whose figure is based on the Bodhidharma, the founder of the Zen sect of Buddhism. Daruma are often depicted in this roundish shape because of a legend that the Bodhidharma stared at a wall in intense meditation for nine years, until both his arms and legs fell off. Daruma are traditionally depicted in red, but can appear in various colors with different meanings. They are considered good luck figures.

This particular top is a type of top known as a “headstand” (sakadachi 逆立ち) top. When spun fast enough it flips upside down and spins on the tip of its handle.

***

***

Hiroi Michiaki: This is a daruma, but I think there’s probably something inside of it.

Janell Landis: It’s a headstand [top].*

*[Editor: A type of top that when spun fast enough flips upside down and spins on the tip of its handle]

Hiroi: There’s something inside, right? Something–

Janell: A string. It has a big head, and–

Hiroi: It spins.

Janell: It’s a headstand top.

Hiroi: Oh really? Ahh, it does stand on its head.

Janell: It’s one of the last ones I got from him.  

Hiroi: Ohh that might be so. This form [of top].

Janell: Yeah. You use it by putting the head down and putting this on, and you pull the string.

Hiroi:  The image on [his stomach] reads kaiun (welcoming good fortune).

Janell: It’s a nice one.

だるま

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

タイトル:

だるま (daruma)
daruma

=====================

だるまがテーマの独楽。だるまは伝統的な日本の人形で、そのモデルになっているのは仏教禅宗の開祖とされている菩提達磨である。だるまがよく丸い形で表現されるのは、菩提達磨が壁を見つめて座禅を九年もの間 続けたので腕と脚が取れてしまったという伝説から来ている。だるまの伝統的な色は赤であるが、他の色もあり、色によってそれぞれ意味もある。どの色も幸運のシンボルとして考えられている。

この独楽は逆立ち独楽という種類の独楽である。十分な速度で回すと、上下逆さになって軸が下になって、逆立ちして回るように作られている。

***

***

廣井道顕:これはやっぱり、だるまだけど、多分何かこの中に入ってるんだと思うんだけど。

ジャネル・ランディス:逆立ちだってね。

廣井:何か入ってるね。何が

ジャネル:紐。これは大きい頭は、そして

廣井:回るんだ。

ジャネル:逆立ち。

廣井:あぁそう?あぁ、逆立ちすんだ。

ジャネル:It’s one of the last ones I got from him.

廣井:あぁそうかもしれないね。この形は。

ジャネル:そう。You use it by putting the head down and putting this on, and you pull the string.

廣井:「開運」とか、絵があんのね。

ジャネル:It’s a nice one.

鬼の子と桃太郎 (Momotarō and the oni’s child)

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Title:

鬼の子と桃太郎 (oni no ko to momotarō)
Momotarō and the oni’s child

=====================

This top depicts Momotarō, sometimes translated as “The Peach Boy,” or “Peach Tarō,” a legendary figure originating in the Edo period (1600-1868). In many versions of the Momotarō legend, Momotarō is a boy who came to Earth inside a giant peach who is discovered by an elderly couple who then raise him. He later leaves his home to fight a band of demons on a distant island, meeting a talking dog, a monkey, and a pheasant on the way who joint him in his quest. Most versions of the legend end with Momotarō defeating the demons, taking their treasure and their chief captive, and then returning home to live happily ever after with his parents.

In this top, Hiroi-sensei has depicted Momotarō babysitting the peach he was born from, which he carries on his back. The oni (ogre) is making fun of him for it and chasing him around taunting him.

***

***

Hiroi Michiaki: Umm, ah, this is Momotaro, Momotaru as a babysitter. On his back, he’s carrying the peach that he was born from, and he’s babysitting it. The oni (ogre) is making fun of him and from behind he’s yelling, “Hey! Hey!” Momotaro’s dejectedly carrying the peach. My own little brother didn’t understand what it was– [Momotaro] carrying the peach.  

 

鬼の子と桃太郎

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

タイトル:

鬼の子と桃太郎 (oni no ko to momotarō)
Momotarō and the oni’s child

=====================

江戸時代(1600-1868年)が起源の伝説上のキャラクター、桃太郎を表現した独楽である。桃太郎の伝説には様々な種類の話があるが、どの話でも桃太郎は巨大な桃から生まれ、桃を見つけた老夫婦に育てられている。後に遠くの島にいる鬼を退治するために家を離れ、その道中で出会った話しのできる犬、猿、キジを鬼退治の仲間に引き入れる。どの話でも桃太郎が鬼を倒し、鬼の親玉を捕らえ、宝を持ち帰って育ての親である老夫婦と幸せに暮らすという終わり方をしている。

この独楽で、廣井先生は桃太郎が自分が生まれ出てきた桃をおんぶして子守をする姿を表現した。鬼は桃の子守をする桃太郎を馬鹿にしておいかけ回している。

***

***

廣井道顕:うんと、あぁ、これは、桃太郎が、桃太郎が、子守だ。桃太郎が自分が出てきた桃をしょって、あの、子守をしてるのね。それを鬼がからかって後ろからヤイヤイってからかってると。桃太郎がガッカリしながら持って。自分の弟になんのかわかんないから。桃をしょってるところ。

 

おちょこ (sake cup)

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

Title:

おちょこ (ochoko)
sake cup

=====================

This top is called “sake cup” and depicts a person holding on tightly to an inverted umbrella during a strong typhoon. The title and the top together form a pun, as the inverted umbrella looks like a sake cup (ochoko) and will collect water from the rain, which looks like sake. When the top is spun, the figure clatters about and looks like it is struggling to hold onto the umbrella in strong winds.

***

***

Hiroi Michiaki: And this is– ah, this is “sake cup.” When it’s raining during a typhoon, on days when the wind is strong, your umbrella goes FWOOOSH and goes like this [inside out]. And [this figure] is doing their best to hold on.

Janell Landis: I received that eight years ago.

Hiroi: Yeah. If you spin this it clatters about and looks like they’re struggling [to hold on].

おちょこ

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.

タイトル:

おちょこ (ochoko)
sake cup

=====================

おちょこがテーマである。台風のときに強風で裏返ってしまった傘を握りしめて立っている人形と共に表現されている。独楽自体と独楽の名前が洒落になっている。裏返しになってしまった傘が、おちょこのように見え、さらに裏返しになった傘に雨水が溜まるようになるので、おちょこに酒が注がれたように見えるからである。独楽を回すと、人形がガタガタと音を立て、強風の中で傘にしがみついて頑張っているかのように見える。

***

***

廣井道顕:うんで、あ、これはおちょこってあの、うんと雨の、台風のときね、風の強い日に傘やっとね、ペコーっとこうなっちゃう。頑張ってこうやって。

ジャネル・ランディス:それ八年前にもらった。

廣井:うん。これ回すとこうガタガタしてね頑張ってるように見える。