Tag Archives: feminism

Jan, the Feminist

In this post, Jan discusses how she developed as a feminist, her desire to share her point of view with her students, and her unique position as an unmarried American woman in Japan.

===

Malina Suity: [1:00:42]: When you were working as a teacher at Miyagi, what were your–did you have any particular duties other than just teaching classes? What were your classes like?

Janell Landis: Um, well. The classes were, as I said, were sometimes with junior high school girls. And that was about fifty kids in one room and reviewing the English studies that they had with their Japanese teachers. They had me twice a week and the other teachers every day. And so it was back up for the Japanese teachers, and then that was true in senior high too. In college, I was given an opportunity with the juniors and seniors to have these elective courses. And then I attempted to really concentrate on some of the issues that women would face. And that’s when my feminist years developed. And I saw some of the girls develop too. And one of them ended up being, working on the wonderful program north of Tokyo that was involved with educating workers from other Asian countries and for commuting to work and so on. [1:02:09]

***

Malina [1:09:50] You mentioned your development as a feminist and working with women’s issues. Can you describe your experience as a woman in postwar Japan?

Janell: Yes. Uh, it was, my own conversion was when I was going with a group of people from New Jersey to what they called the God Box. To a Riverside area where the national church of these mainline denominations was located. And I went into a drug store while we were waiting for the car and I bought the first magazine of Ms. and that changed my life. And I didn’t see…what was your question again?

Malina: Um

Janell: I’m ready to get off of it.

Malina: It’s uh, being a woman in Japan.

Janell [1:10:58]: Oh, a woman in Japan. Well, because of that conversion in the States when I went back. I had the privilege in some of these elective classes to show what women were doing in other countries or so on. So, I myself branched out. But I had a reaction of one of my female Japanese teachers, she thought I was degrading the men. And uh, like I was anti-man. And that really hurt me in a way. I didn’t ever feel like I would, that I would, ever degrade my fellow men that were working on the faculty. I was cautioned then, to be careful not to be too demanding.

But um, like I said, being a single woman. I was my own self and I think I got a little bit different treatment than a wife would. And she would have opportunities that I didn’t have. But I never begrudged the difference. Each of us is given a walk and we have to walk our walk, own walk. We can’t imitate somebody else’s trot, but uh. I never felt…well let’s see I can’t say never. There were times when being a woman in postwar Japan might have been more difficult. But, being an American woman, being a single woman. [laughs] I had some freedoms that my Japanese women didn’t have. I was always–In the first years when things weren’t as progressive, I never got invited to the weddings. But after how many years there, it was like, if they had the American teacher there that was a real special thing. I got took to so many weddings and their parties. But, it was rarely that we were in the weddings. Many of them were held in a Shinto temple, but we were having the wedding parties in these big hotels or these big wedding parlors. And they’d spend a fortune and give everyone a present and so on. But I, in the latter years, I was one of the people they called. [1:14:02]

For more information on Ms. Magazine and the impact it had on women like Jan, read this oral history from New York Magazine.

Photograph of Janell and English Department staff at Miyagi Gakuin via Janell Landis.

 

Advertisements

フェミニスト、ジャネル・ランディス

ジャネルがフェミニストとして成長する過程や、生徒たちにジャネル自身の意見を共有したいという強い思い、そして日本に住む未婚のアメリカ人女性という立場について語っている。

===

マリナ・スーティ:宮城で教師として働いていたとき、あなたは―、ただ授業を持つ以外に特別な仕事はありましたか?授業はどんな感じでしたか?

ジャネル・ランディス:そうねぇ。授業は、まぁさっき言ったけれど、時には女子中学生に教えることもあったの。15人くらいの子たちが一つの部屋に集まって、日本人の先生がやっていたような英語の勉強をしていたの。私は週2回教えていて、他の先生は毎日。だから私は日本人教師の補助みたいなものだったし、高校の授業でも同じだった。大学では、1、2年生の選択科目を教える機会が与えられたの。だから女性が向き合わなければならない問題について専念して教えようと考えたわ。私がフェミニストとして開花した時期だった。学生の中にも何人かフェミニストとして成長した子がいて。中でも1人、東京でアジアの国から出稼ぎに来ている労働者への教育を支援するような素晴らしい活動をするようになった子がいたわ。

***

マリナ:先ほどフェミニストとして成長したことや女性が向き合う問題について触れましたね。戦後の日本においてご自身が女性として経験したことを教えてもらえますか?

ジャネル:いいわよ。そう、あれは、ニュージャージー州から来た人たちとニューヨークのゴッド・ボックス※を何て呼ぶかってことについて話していたときだったわ。主だった宗派の教会があるリバーサイド地域へ向かったときね。 車を待っている間に私は薬屋さんに寄って、初出版の『Ms.』という雑誌を買ったのだけど、それが私の人生を変えたの。当時は分からなかったけど…質問はなんだったかしら?

マリナ:あのう…

ジャネル:話戻しましょうね。

マリナ:えっと、女性として日本で生活することについて。

ジャネル:あぁ、日本で暮らす女性。そうね。アメリカに戻ったときにした会話があったからだったわね。選択科目のいくつかで、他の国では女性がどんなことをしているのかとか色々と教える機会に恵まれたの。それで、私自身の考えも広がったわ。でも、ある日本人の女性教師から、私が男性を卑下しているって反発があったの。私が、まぁ、反男性主義者みたいな。本当に傷ついたわ。そんなこと考えたこともなかったのよ、私が、そんな、一緒に頑張って働いている男性たちを見下すようなことをしようだなんて。その時に、あまり、きついフェミニストにならないように気を付けないと、って思った。

でもそうね、さっき言ったけど、独身女性として。私は私自身でいることができたし、誰かの奥さんっていうのとはちょっと違った扱いをされたわね。きっと誰かの奥さんだったら独身の私が得られなかった経験があったんでしょうね。でもその違いを嫉ましく思ったことはなかった。人はそれぞれの道が用意されてて、自分自身の道を歩まないといけないんだもの。他の人の道を真似して歩んだりできないんだから。でも、まぁ。私は絶対に…まぁ、絶対になんて言えないのよね。戦後の日本で女性として生きることは時に困難なことだったかもしれないわ。でも、アメリカ人女性として、独身女性として。私は日本人の女友達よりも自由だったわね。私はいつも– まだ世の中が積極的に進歩しているとは言えなかった最初の数年間、誰も私を結婚式に招待しなかった。でも歳月が過ぎれば、アメリカ人の先生がいることがすごく特別なことみたいな扱いになった。結婚式やらパーティーにたくさん呼ばれるようになった。でも、結婚式自体に行くことは滅多になかった。ほとんどが神道の寺社で執り行われたけど、結婚式のパーティーは大きなホテルとか式場でやってたから。大枚をはたいて披露宴をして、みんなにプレゼントを配ったりしてた。でも私は、何年経っても、呼ばれる側の人間だった。

※ゴッド・ボックス: ニューヨーク州、マンハッタンのリバーサイド通りにある19階建てのオフィスビルで、アメリカにある主だった教会や宗教関連の非営利団体がオフィスを置いているため通称ゴッド・ボックスと呼ばれている

===

ジャネルのようなアメリカの女性たちに大きな影響を与えたMs.誌の誕生についてはこちらのNew York Magazineに載るオーラルヒストリーの特集をご覧ください。

以上の写真はジャネル・ランディス(右)と宮城学院女子大学英文学部の事務員です。